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Topics of Importance Employee Relations

2015 Performance

KEY FACTS

As at December 31, 2015, we employed 8,743 full- and part-time permanent employees, and 1,871 contract employees, in Canada and the U.S.

We invested about 1.01 percent of our total salary costs—which is about $1,402 per employee—in employee training.

In 2014, which was the last year we conducted our Perspectives survey, we achieved an employee engagement score of 74 percent.

In November 2015, a significant economic downturn in our industry necessitated that we lay off five percent of our employees—325 of whom were permanent, 265 of whom were in Canada and 60 of whom were in the U.S. Throughout the process, we maintained our core values of Safety, Integrity and Respect; and implemented comprehensive change management plans to assist with the transition. We also provided laid-off employees with packages that exceeded legislated
minimums, and that included outplacement assistance and employee and family counseling.

Despite this workforce adjustment, we continue to build internal capacity and to focus our efforts on employee retention and engagement, and leadership development. Following is an overview of our 2015 results.

Attracting, Developing and Retaining People in Support of our Business Strategy

Onboarding

Our goal is to ensure that our new employees settle quickly into their jobs and become fully integrated into our company and culture. As such, on their first day, we give them a welcome bag that includes information about Enbridge, an onboarding booklet, a new employee checklist and the Enbridge ring, which symbolizes our shared and individual commitment to the safety of the communities in which we conduct business.

In addition, we involve new employees in a program that gives them a consistent overview of our company, and that highlights the various departments and business segments within it. The program includes new employee workshops, site visits, a buddy system, a curriculum of required online courses, a program guide and checklists, surveys and special intranet pages for new employees. It also includes ongoing support and orientation from the new employees’ People Leaders, departments and teams.

Employee Development

Every year, our employees each create Individual Development Plans (IDPs) in partnership with their People Leaders. The plans form the basis of their skills and competency development, and of their career progression. In 2015, 81 percent of our employees completed IDPs.

To ensure that we support the diverse technical, functional and non-technical needs outlined in our employees’ IDPs, we offer a variety of approaches to learning:

Enbridge University (ENBU) – We offer high-caliber internal programs through two ENBU campuses in Canada and one in the U.S. In 2015, the three campuses aligned to create the ENBU Framework under which they harmonized their strategy, governance, research and operations to create a consistent enterprise-wide learning experience. ENBU now offers courses in the areas of energy studies, productivity, project and risk management, business analysis and personal excellence. The courses, which are delivered either by external facilitators or subject-matter experts within Enbridge, or through self-directed online modules, focus on the concepts and skills that employees can directly apply in their current roles, or that will help qualify them for future opportunities. In 2015, 8,777 participants took part in 514 courses.

External Courses, Certificates and Degree Programs – Employees can receive support for these through departmental sponsorships or through our enterprise-wide education tuition reimbursement program.

Mentorships- We maintain an enterprise-wide mentorship program that helps employees expand their perspectives, diversify their thinking and accelerate their development. Mentorships can include job shadowing, site visits, business case study reviews, participation in departmental presentations, and one-on-one meetings. In 2015, our mentorship program involved 1,103 protégés and 869 mentors, 413 of whom are both protégés and mentors. At the end of 2015, 94 percent of the participants reported that their mentoring relationship had benefitted their professional development.

Employee and Executive Compensation and Bonuses

We determine compensation using an objective and equitable process during which we consider the internal value of various roles, market rates of pay, and employee skills and competencies. We also use an objective performance management system that enables top performers to achieve higher-than-average salary increases in any given year. Our remuneration policies apply to our company as a whole.

The statistics we present here are based on the salaries of our permanent, full-time, active, non-union employees.

Base Salaries – The base salaries we provide take into consideration an employee’s role and competencies, market conditions, as well as attraction and retention issues. To determine base salaries, we benchmark ourselves against large pipeline, energy and utility companies that are similar to us in size, enterprise value, revenues and risk profile.

Starting Salaries – The starting salaries we offer compare with the minimum wages in Ontario, Alberta and Texas (which are key locations where our main corporate offices are located) as follows:

2015 Enbridge Starting Rates versus Provincial/State Minimum Wages
Region Minimum Wage Enbridge Entry-level Minimum Wage Enbridge Entry- level Maximum Wage Enbridge Entry-level Rates as a Percentage to Minimum Wage
Ontario $11.25 $18.13 $28.99 161.1% - 257.7%
Toronto
Alberta $11.20 $18.13 $28.99 161.8% - 258.8%
Calgary
Edmonton
Texas $7.25 $13.85 $22.12 191.0% - 305.0%
Houston

Women’s Salaries Compared with Men’s – Women’s salaries compare with men’s salaries at Enbridge as follows:

2015 Average Salary Ratio Male to Female by Job Ladder Level % (Canada & U.S.)
Level 1 100.4%
Level 2 100.1%
Level 3 99.2%
Level 4 100.6%
Level 5 102.2%
Level 6 98.5%
Level 7 100.4%
2015 Remuneration Female/Male Executive Level (Base Salary Only) Management Level (Base Salary Only) Management Level Base Salary + Other Cash Incentives (such as bonus) Non-Management Level (Base Salary Only)
Female $267,864 $167,447 $201,791 $82,068
Male $273,400 $169,853 $204,739 $94,191

Employee Wages and Benefits – The graph below shows the total amount that we paid in employee wages and benefits in 2013, 2014 and 2015. In 2015, our payroll total was $913 million, which does not include benefits, and our total compensation paid was $1,463 million, which include benefits.

Total Compensation Paid 2013 2014 2015

CEO and Executive Compensation – Our executive compensation program is designed to motivate our senior leaders to deliver strong corporate performance and to invest the company’s capital in ways that minimize risk and maximize return, while supporting core business goals.

Our Board of Directors is responsible for approving the executive compensation program. Directors review our company’s short-, medium- and long-term business plans, and link our executives’ compensation to the timeframes in the plans, thereby ensuring that our leaders continually deliver value to shareholders, not just in the short term.

We benchmark our executive compensation programs against companies that are a similar size and that have a similar complexity in Canada and the U.S. to ensure that we are competitively rewarding our executives.

Per the table below, in 2015, our President & CEO’s base salary as at December 31, 2015 was $1,281,000, and his total annualized compensation (reflecting the share of 2012 performance stock options that were attributed to 2015) was $9,799,182.  The ratio of our President & CEO’s total annualized compensation to that of the average employee’s total annualized compensation was 79.

CEO Compensation Total CEO Compensation
Employee Compensation Median Employee Compensation
Total annualized compensation of the CEO, or any equivalent position $9,799,182
Median or mean total annualized compensation of all employees, except the Chief Executive Officer (or any equivalent position) $124,212
Ratio of the mean or median employee total annualized compensation to the total annualized compensation of the CEO 79
Currency Canadian

In 2015, our President & CEO’s base salary increase was 12 percent, and the ratio of his base salary increase to that of the average employee was 5.02. In 2015, his total annualized compensation percent increase was 43.5 percent.

The longest performance period we use to evaluate our President & CEO’s variable compensation is six and one-half years. The timeframe we use to pay out variable CEO compensation is as follows:

Timeframe for Variable Payout of CEO Compensation % of Total Variable Compensation
0 - 3 years 35
Longer than 3 years 65

Variable CEO compensation can vest for a maximum of five years.

We have a clawback provision in place that would permit us to recoup over-payments made to executives in the event of fraudulent or willful misconduct.

For detailed remuneration data for each member of our Executive Leadership Team, please see Enbridge’s 2016 Management Information Circular. [provide link]

Benefits

Following is an overview of the benefits we offer in Canada and the U.S. The benefits differ by country mostly because of the differences in the two countries’ national health care systems.

Canadian Benefits – Our Canadian benefits program for regular full- and part-time employees is a flex program that allows each employee to choose the plan that best meets his or her needs. Employees use employer-provided flex credits to pay for their benefit choices. The flex credit formula is base salary percentage + family status (single, couple, family) + participation in the Enbridge Savings Plan (up to 2.5 percent of base salary).

Employees must purchase a minimum level of life insurance (1x salary) and long-term disability insurance (60 percent of base salary). All other benefit purchases are at the employee’s discretion. We pay surplus credits to the employee as taxable cash.

In addition to the benefits that we provide under our flexible benefits program, we also provide a set of fixed or mandatory benefits to full- and part-time regular employees.

In addition, our Canadian program provides a limited set of fixed benefits to full- and part-time temporary employees, casual employees and summer/co-op students. Enbridge fully pays all fixed benefits, and the coverage for all benefit plans is effective on the employee’s date of hire. The table below shows details of our various fixed benefits.

Canadian Benefit Eligibility
Benefit Employee Type
Regular Full Time 40 hrs Regular Part Time 24 – 39 hrs Regular Part Time 16 – 23 hrs Temp Full Time 40 hrs3 Temp Part Time 16 – 39 hrs3 Casual Summer / Co-op Students
Fixed/Mandatory Benefits: Benefits provided by Enbridge at no cost to the employee. Benefits are effective on the date of hire.
Flex Credits 1 Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Basic Life Insurance* Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Business Travel Insurance Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Short-Term Disability Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Long-Term Disability* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Parking Allowance Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Education Reimbursement Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Dependent Child Scholarship Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Vacation Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Scheduled Days Off 2 Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Recognized Paid Holidays Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Wellness Program Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Emergency Childcare Reimbursement Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Alternative Work Arrangements Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No
Pension Plan Yes Yes Yes No No No No
1Regular employees use flex credits to pay for benefits marked with an “*”; other mandatory/fixed benefits are paid for by Enbridge outside the flex plan. Benefits for Temp, Casual and Student employees are paid for directly by Enbridge.
2Employee is eligible for an SDO in each full month worked.
3Temporary Union employees are eligible for flex benefits same as regular employees except they do not receive coverage for STD/LTD and cannot participate in the savings plan.
Flexible Benefits: 1Available only to Regular employees–employees use flex credits to pay for these benefit choices. If available flex credits exceed the cost of benefits, the balance flows to the employee as taxable cash; if the cost of benefits exceeds available flex credits, the employee pays the additional costs through payroll deduction.
Employee Optional Life* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Spouse Optional Life* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Child Optional Life* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Employee Optional AD&D* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Spouse Optional AD&D* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Child Optional AD&D* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Optional LTD* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Extended Health Care* Yes Yes Yes Yes4 Yes4 No No
Dental Care* Yes Yes Yes Yes4 Yes4 No No
Health Spending Account* Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Savings Plan Yes Yes Yes No No No No

4Temporary employees do not receive a choice of health and dental plans but, rather, they receive an assigned level of coverage that is fully employer paid.

U.S. Benefits – Our U.S. benefits program is flexible in that it allows employees to elect the benefit plans and coverage that best meets their needs and the needs of their families. Our U.S. benefit package differs from our Canadian benefit package because of the differences in the two countries’ healthcare delivery systems, and because of the cost impact that benefits have in the U.S. Also, the cost of benefits in the U.S. is not determined by a factor of the employee’s pay, but rather by the cost of the voluntary benefits provided to each employee and the cost of any voluntary benefits elected by the employee.

Regular employees that work at least 30 hours per week upon hire are provided with various basic benefits paid by Enbridge, as outlined in the table below. Most of these benefits are effective the date the employee is hired, unless indicated otherwise in the table. The Basic Life and Basic Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) insurance provided is one times annual base pay for the employee, $15 thousand for spouse and $5 thousand for each dependent child. The business travel insurance provided for employees is two times their annual base pay. The leave programs vary based on business segment and work location. Employees of our Gas Pipelines, Processing & Energy Services business segment (GPP&ES) receive short-term disability, paid time off (PTO) and flex days off, whereas employees of our Liquids Pipelines business segment (LP) and Major Projects business unit (MP) receive temporary disability, vacation and scheduled days off. The long-term disability program applies to all U.S. employees and provides a benefit that is 60 percent of their base pay.

Regular employees that work at least 30 hours per week are also eligible for various voluntary benefits that involve cost sharing, as outlined in the table below. Employees must elect voluntary benefits within 30 days of their date of hire to be eligible for these benefits, otherwise they have to wait until the next annual benefits open enrollment period to add them.

Non-Regular employees who work at least 30 hours per week, have limited benefit coverage and options, as indicated in the table below.

U.S. Benefit Eligibility

 

 

Benefit

Employee Type

Regular FT (40 hrs/wk)

Regular PT scheduled 30+ hrs/wk

Regular PT scheduled

> 30 hrs/wk

Temporary

classified as a “Laborer”

Temp scheduled 30+ hrs/wk (not a “Laborer”)

Temp scheduled > 30+ hrs/wk (not a “Laborer”)

Basic Benefits: Benefits provided by Enbridge at no cost to the employee.

Benefits for eligible employees are effective at the date of hire unless indicated differently below.

Basic Life Insurance

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Basic AD&D Insurance

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Business Travel Insurance

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Paid Time Off (PTO) /Vacation

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Flex Days Off 1/Scheduled Days Off

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Recognized Paid Holidays

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

Short-Term/Temporary Disability

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Long-Term Disability

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Wellness Program

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Employee Assistance Program

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Emergency Childcare Reimbursement

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Enbridge Cares Program

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Higher Education Awards 2

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Alternative Work Arrangements

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Pension Plan

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes 3

No

No

 1Employee is eligible for first Flex Day Off if hired in first month of quarter, otherwise must wait until following quarter.

 2 Employee must have one year of service at June 1 to be eligible for program.

 3Temporary Laborers are eligible after one year of vesting service.

Voluntary Benefits: Employee elected benefits that require them to pay a portion of the cost. The effective date of these benefits is the first of the month following their date of hire until indicated differently.

Supplemental Life Insurance

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Supplemental AD&D Insurance

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Medical & Pharmacy Plan

Yes

Yes

No

No 4

No 4

No

Dental Plan

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Vision Plan

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Flexible Spending Accounts

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Savings Plan–401(k)

Yes

Yes

No

Yes 5

No

No

Metlaw/Hyatt Legal Services

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

College Savings (529) Plan

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Transportation (Houston Only)

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Educational Reimbursement

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

 4Temporary employees meeting the eligibility requirements of the Affordable Care Act are offered coverage.

5Temporary Laborers are eligible after one year of vesting service.

Employee Wellness Programs

As with many employers, we offer traditional benefits, including access to an Employee and Family Assistance Program. However, we have opted to be more innovative so we can more positively impact the health and wellbeing of our people.

In 2014, we implemented a Wellness Program in the U.S. that provides employees with the tools, resources and financial incentives to promote and reward healthy behaviors. Then in May 2015, we launched a Canada-wide wellness program, including several enhancements to align with current best practices. In 2016, we will update the program in the U.S. to harmonize with the Canadian program.

We designed our new Wellness program in Canada in partnership with Preventure, a company that helps organizations develop and launch tailored wellness programs. We designed the program to include all of our employees and their families, regardless of their health status or wellness goals. The program provides tools, resources and opportunities to engage our people and their families in maintaining and improving three aspects of their wellbeing: physical, mental and financial.

The focus on these three aspects of individual health is intentional. We wanted to give employees an integrated program that goes beyond physical health, resulting in a more holistic, well-rounded program.

Examples of the tools the program offers include: tracking steps or minutes of activity, understanding and tracking the types of foods consumed, recognizing and understanding mental health and creating a budget. It is designed to enable people of any ability to focus on their health and to take action.

Program features include:

  • a wellness portal allowing employees and their spouses to access wellness program information, tools, resources and challenges from work and home,
  • annual confidential on-site biometric screening clinics offered free of charge at Enbridge field and office locations across Canada allowing our employees and their spouses to learn about their biometric health numbers and identify potential health risks,
  • health risk assessments,
  • exercise logs,
  • exercise examples and planner,
  • meal planning and food log,
  • recipe analyzer,
  • challenges relating to physical, mental and financial health,
  • online workshops, and
  • a local wellness ambassador.

Retirement Planning

In addition to the benefits that we provide under our formal benefits programs, we offer our employees information on retirement planning and pension management. We also provide pre-retirement workshops to employees 45 years or older to help them transition to retirement. This workshops include segments on financial planning, goal setting and lifestyle changes.

Defined Benefit Plan Obligations

We maintain pension plans that provide defined benefit and/or defined contribution pension benefits to employees. No employee contributions are required and participation is mandatory for eligible employees in Canada and the U.S.

Pension costs and obligations for the defined benefit pension plans are based on actuarial calculations using assumptions, including discount rates, expected rates of return on plan assets, projected salary increases, retirement age, mortality and termination rates. Our management determines the assumptions and an external actuary reviews them each year.

At year-end 2015, the value of the assets in our Canadian and U.S. defined benefit pension plans was $2,229 million and our pension obligation was $2,551 million, leaving a shortfall of $322 million which equals about 0.8 percent of our market capitalization. We amortize the actual results—which could differ from our assumptions and could materially affect the recognized expenses and recorded obligations—over future periods.

We remain able to pay the current benefit obligations using cash from operations. In 2016 we expect to pay approximately $118 million into our defined benefit pension plans.

Benefits payable from the defined benefit plans are based on members’ years of service and average remuneration. We contribute to these plans in accordance with applicable legislation and independent actuarial valuations. We invest the pension funds primarily in publicly traded equity and fixed-income securities. We do not offer a sustainability-focused investment option.

For more information, please see Enbridge Inc.’s Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2015.

Managing, Monitoring and Planning our Workforce to Align Talent and Skills with Business Priorities

We manage, monitor and plan our workforce such that we align key talent and skills with our business priorities. Following are some of the ways we conduct this work:

Performance Management

At least twice each year—but quarterly if possible—employees meet with their People Leaders to discuss their short- and long-term goals, job accountabilities, safety-related activities and professional development. They enter the results of their discussions in our online performance management system and in Individual Development Plan documents.

In 2015, we created year-end performance review documents for 94 percent of our permanent employees through our online performance management system. The remaining six percent included unionized employees whose feedback was captured through a paper-based system, employees on long-term disability insurance and small groups of employees in remote operating areas.

ENBU supports the performance management process by providing courses on how to conduct career conversations, write objectives, and give and receive performance feedback. We also arm employees with job ladders that outline career options.

Incentives for Managing our Response to Climate Change

We incent certain individuals to effectively manage our responses to climate change. Our CSO, for example, has a mandate to increase our level of engagement in discussions regarding how climate change should impact our decision making and investments. Some of her responsibilities—such as disclosing our climate change-related performance, engaging with business segments on their climate action plans, and evaluating climate change risks and opportunities—are tied to her bonus.

Similarly, employees in our Green Power, Transmission and Emerging Technology group (GPT&ET) receive bonuses for securing new wind, solar and geothermal energy and waste heat recovery projects that meet our investment criteria and that address climate change.

Executive Annual Bonuses Tied to Non-financial Performance

We tie a percentage of our annual executive bonuses to performance metrics that pertain to safety, the maintenance of the fitness of our systems, and environmental performance. The following chart shows the percentages that these areas account for at the company, business segment and individual levels, as they apply to our CEO, our business segment EVPs and corporate EVPs.

The Overall Total column shows the percentage—or percentage range—of the CEO’s and EVP’s ultimate annual bonus that is tied to their non-financial performance metrics. For example, between 15.5 percent and 21.5 percent of our CEO’s annual bonus is tied to safety, the maintenance of the fitness of our systems, and environmental performance.

Percentage of Executive Annual Bonuses Tied to Safety, Maintenance of the Fitness of our Systems, and Environmental Performance
Enterprise Level Business Segment Level Individual Performance Level Overall Total
Chief Executive Officer 60% No alignment (all financial performance metrics1) =0% 20%, 100% of which is tied to non-financial performance metrics2 pertaining to safety, the maintenance of the fitness of our systems, and environmental performance (67%), and other (33%) =~13.5% overall 20%, 40% of which is tied to non-financial performance metrics pertaining to safety =8% overall 15.5 - 21.5% (higher end more likely)
Executive Vice Presidents (business segments) 25% No alignment (all financial performance metrics) =0% 50%, 40% of which is tied to non-financial performance metrics pertaining to safety, the maintenance of the fitness of our systems, and environmental performance = 20% overall 25%, at least 40% of which is tied to non-financial performance metrics pertaining to safety =10% overall 22.5% - 30% (higher end more likely)
Executive Vice Presidents (corporate) 60% No alignment (all financial performance metrics) = 0% 20%, 10%of which is tied to non-financial performance metrics pertaining to safety, the maintenance of the fitness of our systems, and environmental performance = 9% overall 20%, 10% of which is tied to non-financial performance metrics pertaining to safety = 2% overall 9%

1 Financial performance metrics may include earnings per share and other external financial success metrics.

2 Non-financial performance metrics may include percentage improvement in system leak-detection sensitivity and reliability; number of system inspections; number of action items resulting from process safety management audits closed; governance, compliance and ethics initiatives; Environment, Health & Safety training course completions; number of spills and releases; number of safety observations recorded by employees; frequency of process safety incidents; total recordable injury frequency (employee and contractor); number of action items closed from incident investigations; employee retention; and percentage of employees having career conversations.

Maintaining our Employee Turnover Rate

We aim to maintain our voluntary employee turnover rate in the four to 10 percent range, and our voluntary new employee turnover rate in the six to eight percent range. In 2015, our voluntary employee turnover rate as a percentage of our total workforce population was three percent and our voluntary new employee turnover rate was seven percent. Both fell within our target range.

Turnover Rate by Gender and Business Segment

Our total turnover for 2015 was 835 permanent employees. As at December 31, 2015, our turnover rate by gender and business segment was as follows.

Liquids Pipelines (Canada & U.S.) Major Projects (Canada & U.S.) Gas Pipelines, Processing & Energy Services Gas Distribution Corporate & International Enterprise-wide
Voluntary Male 1.98% 3.16% 5.73% 1.06% 3.23% 2.61%
Female 4.38% 5.24% 6.13% 1.97% 2.04% 3.72%
Total 2.68% 4.03% 5.84% 1.40% 2.62% 2.99%
Involuntary Male 4.91% 12.36% 2.69% 1.79% 11.11% 4.40%
Female 5.43% 12.90% 6.37% 1.97% 8.16% 5.39%
Total 5.06% 12.58% 3.68% 1.86% 9.60% 4.74%
Retirement Male 1.27% 1.44% 1.74% 2.92% 1.79% 1.82%
Female 1.33% 0.81% 0.71% 2.74% 0.68% 1.57%
Total 1.29% 1.17% 1.46% 2.85% 1.22% 1.74%
Deaths in Service Male 0.04% 0.57% 0.17% 0.07% 0.00% 0.10%
Female 0.10% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.34% 0.07%
Total 0.06% 0.34% 0.13% 0.04% 0.17% 0.09%
Total Turnover Male 8.19% 17.53% 10.33% 5.83% 16.13% 8.94%
Female 11.24% 18.95% 13.21% 6.68% 11.22% 10.75%
Total 9.09% 18.12% 11.10% 6.15% 13.61% 9.55%

Turnover Rate by Age Group

As at December 31, 2015, our turnover by age group was as follows:

up to 24 25 to 29 30 to 34 35 to 39 40 to 44 45 to 49 50 to 54 55 to 59 60 and above Total
Voluntary Male 0.70% 4.53% 3.20% 2.91% 2.51% 2.42% 1.82% 1.61% 1.63% 2.61%
  Female 1.54% 7.00% 6.29% 2.95% 3.79% 2.51% 2.32% 1.75% 1.46% 3.72%
  Total 0.96% 5.39% 4.24% 2.93% 2.95% 2.45% 2.00% 1.66% 1.59% 2.99%
Involuntary Male 4.20% 2.03% 2.35% 2.80% 5.94% 5.78% 5.33% 5.81% 7.63% 4.40%
  Female 3.08% 3.79% 3.56% 4.32% 5.56% 8.29% 5.15% 8.07% 6.57% 5.39%
  Total 3.85% 2.64% 2.76% 3.30% 5.81% 6.65% 5.27% 6.52% 7.34% 4.74%
Retirement Male 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 5.16% 20.16% 1.82%
  Female 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 6.32% 20.44% 1.57%
  Total 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 5.52% 20.24% 1.74%
Deaths in Service Male 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.28% 0.16% 0.82% 0.10%
  Female 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.25% 0.00% 0.00% 0.35% 0.00% 0.07%
  Total 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.09% 0.00% 0.18% 0.22% 0.60% 0.09%
Total Turnover Male 4.90% 6.56% 5.55% 5.71% 8.45% 8.20% 7.43% 12.74% 30.25% 8.94%
  Female 4.62% 10.79% 9.85% 7.27% 9.60% 10.80% 7.47% 16.49% 28.47% 10.75%
  Total 4.81% 8.04% 7.00% 6.23% 8.85% 9.11% 7.45% 13.92% 29.76% 9.55%

Return-to-Work and Retention Rates Following Parental Leave

In 2015, 98 of the permanent employees who had left on parental leave in either 2014 or 2015 returned to work. Seventy-three of the 79 women who returned (92.4 percent) were employed with Enbridge as of December 31, 2015, and all of the 19 male employees who returned to work were employed with Enbridge as of December 31, 2015.

Continue to Implement an Enterprise-wide Leadership Development Program

In 2015, as part of our continuing efforts to cultivate a shared leadership philosophy and strengthen our leadership capabilities across the company, we completed the third year of our five-year plan to design and deliver customized leadership development programs and resources, and to establish clear accountabilities for leadership development through defined competencies.

As part of this initiative, we:

  • engaged 504 of our leaders in leadership symposia,
  • hosted 11 new leader transition workshops and webinars for 207 new or newly promoted leaders,
  • designed the Leadership Foundation’s certificate program for our first-level leaders, which is intended to strengthen existing leadership practices, further develop skills and enhance leaders’ effectiveness,
  • launched nine enterprise-wide Leadership Experience Action-based Development (LEAD) programs for LEAD 1 and LEAD 2 certificate programs, each of which involved up to 26 first- and mid-level leaders (253 high-potential leaders participated),
  • designed the LEAD 3 Excellence certificate program for our senior leaders and began identifying candidates for it,
  • worked with Enbridge University (ENBU) to offer 57 courses on topics ranging from presentation skills, emotional intelligence, coaching and financial acumen to 688 leaders,
  • introduced a variety of leadership resources, such as action videos, quick reference guides and leadership spotlights, to provide timely support.

In addition, we facilitated a number of job rotations, lateral moves and promotions among our senior leaders and ensured that 360-degree feedback assessments were completed for all of our executive and senior leaders.

We also enhanced our commitment to developing and retaining senior leaders for succession purposes. At present, 91 percent of our executive leaders and 87 percent of our senior leaders have at least one successor in place.

Critical Talent Retention

Identifying and managing critical talent is key to our business continuity and to the execution of our corporate plans. While we know that all employees contribute to the successful execution of our strategic priorities, we recognize that certain roles and individuals have a greater impact on business-critical outcomes.

As such, we identify and manage critical talent and critical roles as part of our Talent Review and Succession Planning process. We manage the risk of losing critical talent primarily by providing differentiated rewards, variable compensation and targeted career planning and development to certain employees. In 2015, we helped our leaders identify, select and manage critical talent more consistently across the organization.

Maintain our Investment in Employee Training

In 2015, we invested about 1.01 percent of our total salary costs—which is about $1,402 per employee—in employee training.

Although we track our training information through a enterprise-wide Learning Management System (LMS), and although all of our employees have access to it, some of our business segments have specific training needs that they manage outside the system.

Based on just our LMS data, in 2015, our employees— including permanent, temporary and contract employees—benefited from 3,890 instructor-led offerings and 565 web-based offerings of 1,254 courses.

On average, employees completed 10.9 courses each, which averages out to 19.4 hours of learning per employee. Female employees made up 33.8 percent of the learners, with an average of 10.5 courses each, and an average of 20.1 hours of learning. Male workers made up the remaining 66.2 percent of learners, with an average of 11.8 courses each, and an average of 21.6 hours of learning.

One of our technical operations groups also maintains an LMS and, in 2015, it offered 469 courses to 1,767 employees and temporary employees to meet their specific training needs. The employees to whom the group offered the courses comprised 82.4 percent male learners and 17.6 percent female learners. On average, the male learners in this group took 27.7 courses for 97.0 hours, while the female learners took 10.2 courses for 32.5 hours.

When we analyze learning by leadership role, our 2,740 executives, vice presidents, directors, managers and supervisors/leads completed an average of 10.9 courses each, which equals an average of 21.1 hours of learning. Males in this same group averaged 21.2 hours in 11.1 courses, while females averaged 20.8 hours in 10.4 courses.

Our 9,995 individual contributors, including advisors, analysts, coordinators, administrative assistants and others, completed an average of 10.8 courses each, with an average of 19 hours of learning. We do not track gender among our contractors; however, of our 7,055 employee individual contributors in 2015, males took an average of 23.1 hours of training in 12.7 courses, while females took an average of 20.7 hours in 10.8 courses.

Our investments in training and education enable our employees to acquire and enhance the skills they need to perform their best in their current roles, and to prepare for future roles. With regard to preparation for future roles, in 2015, internal full-time, part-time or temporary employee candidates filled 34.4 percent of our open positions.

Maintain our Employee Engagement Level

Through our Perspectives survey, which we invite our employees to participate in every two years, employees have a dedicated channel through which they can communicate their feedback to leaders, and we have a clear method by which to measure our employee engagement levels.

In 2014, which was the last year we conducted the survey, we achieved an employee engagement score of 74 percent. As a result of that score, we focused on five key areas for improvement:

  • Managing Performance – We standardized our methodology for establishing performance objectives across the company. We also encouraged more frequent performance reviews and feedback between leaders and employees, and trained leaders and employees on how to conduct effective performance review discussions.
  • Work Process – We examined ways to streamline work processes.
  • Recognition – We implemented the Stellar recognition program as a way of recognizing and celebrating the individuals and teams who embody Enbridge’s core values in their work and in their interactions with customers and other stakeholders.
  • Career Management – We introduced a standardized online tool that employees can use to track their career conversations. We also provided training to leaders on how they can enhance their team members’ career development.
  • Work Life Balance – We worked with Preventure, a leading corporate wellness company, to create and roll out a new wellness program in Canada. The program helps employees improve their physical, mental and financial wellbeing regardless of their current state. The U.S. Wellness program, rolled out in 2014, will be updated in 2016.

We will conduct the next Perspectives survey in 2016, at which time we will again develop enterprise-wide and local action plans based on the results.